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COTS Usage & DO-254 Compliance

COTS Usage & DO-254 Compliance

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In the aviation industry, it is essential to ensure that all avionics hardware is safe and reliable. The Design Assurance Guidance for Airborne Electronic Hardware (DO-254) provides a set of guidelines for the development and certification of airborne electronic hardware. One of the challenges in complying with DO-254 is the use of Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components. COTS components are readily available in the market and are often used in avionics hardware design due to their cost-effectiveness and availability. However, using COTS components in airborne electronic hardware design requires special considerations to ensure compliance with DO-254.

DO-254 compliance is essential for ensuring that the airborne electronic hardware is safe and reliable. DO-254 specifies five levels of hardware design assurance, ranging from Level A to Level E. The level of hardware design assurance required depends on the system’s criticality and the level of risk associated with the system. To ensure compliance with DO-254, avionics hardware designers need to ensure that all design elements are traceable, verifiable, and validated.

The use of COTS components in avionics hardware design can be challenging for DO-254 compliance because these components have already been developed and tested, and their internal design details are not always available to the avionics hardware designer. This can create challenges in meeting DO-254 requirements for traceability and verification of the hardware design. To address this challenge, the avionics hardware designer needs to understand the requirements of DO-254 and the challenges associated with using COTS components in avionics hardware design.

One approach to ensuring DO-254 compliance when using COTS components is to use a supplier that provides hardware that has been developed and tested to DO-254 standards. Such hardware can be certified at a lower level of design assurance and, as a result, reduce the cost and risk associated with DO-254 compliance. This approach is often referred to as Safety-Certifiable COTS (SC-COTS) components.

DO-331, the Model-Based Development and Verification Supplement to DO-178C and DO-278A, provides guidance for using model-based methods in the development and verification of airborne systems and equipment. DO-331 is relevant to DO-254 compliance when using COTS components because it provides guidance for using model-based methods in the verification of COTS components.

The use of model-based methods can help ensure DO-254 compliance by providing a way to verify the COTS component’s functionality without having access to its internal design details. This can reduce the cost and risk associated with DO-254 compliance when using COTS components.

In summary, complying with DO-254 when using COTS components in avionics hardware design can be challenging. However, the use of Safety-Certifiable COTS (SC-COTS) components and model-based methods can help reduce the cost and risk associated with DO-254 compliance. DO-331 provides guidance for using model-based methods in the verification of COTS components. By following the guidelines provided by DO-254 and DO-331, avionics hardware designers can ensure that their hardware designs are safe, reliable, and compliant with industry standards.

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