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How to write System Requirement(SRS) documents

A Software Requirement Specification Document (SRS) is an essential document for software development that provides a detailed description of the needs and requirements of a particular project. It outlines the objectives, scope, background information, design details, implementation plan, and other related activities. The SRS document serves as a contract between the customer and developer to ensure that both parties understand the specifications and expectations of the product being developed. Additionally, it helps to reduce risks by ensuring that all stakeholders fully understand what is expected from them during each phase of the project. A well-crafted SRS document should be complete, clear, and concise so that it can easily be understood by both developers and customers alike. Furthermore, having an SRS in place ensures that any changes or updates to the product during development can be easily documented and tracked. This helps to minimize confusion and ensures that the end product meets all of the requirements specified in the document. Overall, an SRS is a critical tool for successful software development projects as it provides a clear framework for success. With proper use, it can help teams achieve quality results with minimal effort.

How to write System Requirement(SRS) documents

Table of Contents

Software Requirement Specification Vs Business Requirement Specification

People sometimes mix the concepts of software and business requirement specifications. Actually, they both are quite different.

The main difference between software requirement specification and business requirement specification is that the former captures all information related to the software while the latter captures all information related to the business.

S. No.
Software Requirements Specification (SRS)
Business Requirements Specification (BRS)
1.
It specifies the functional and non-functional requirements that are present in the software.
It is a formal document that describes the various requirements provided by the client/stakeholders.
2.
It is derived from the Business Requirements Specification (BRS).
It is derived from the client’s requirements and interactions.
3.
It is created by a system analyst or a system architect or a business analyst.
It is created by a business analyst.
4.
It describes both the technical and functional specifications of the software also at a high level.
It describes the functional specifications of the software at a very high level.
5.
It deals with the resources that the company provides.
It deals with business requirements.
6.
It describes how the business functions when using the software or application.
It defines the customer's needs. The document is used from the beginning to the end of the project.
7.
Tables and use cases are included.
Tables and use cases are not included.

Essential Components of an SRS

The main sections of a software requirements specification are:

  • Business Drivers – The reasons why the customer is looking to build a system are described in this section. This section further includes the problems the customer is facing with the current system and the opportunities the new system will be providing.
  • Business Model – The business model that the system is entailed to support is discussed in this section. It further includes various other details like the organizational and business context, main business functions, and process flow diagrams of the system.
  • Functional and System Requirements – This section typically details requirements that are organized in a hierarchical structure. The functional requirements are at the top level and the detailed system requirements are listed as sub-items.
  • System Use Cases – This section consists of a Unified Modeling Language (UML) use case diagram explaining all the key external entities that will be interacting with the system and the different use cases they’ll have to perform.
  • Technical Requirements – This section discusses all the non-functional requirements that make up the technical environment and the technical limitations in which the software will be operating.  
  • System Qualities – In this section, the numerous qualities of the system are defined such as reliability, serviceability, security, scalability, availability, and maintainability.
  • Limitations and Assumptions – All the limitations imposed on the system design from the customer’s point of view are described in this section. The various assumptions by the engineering team about what to expect during the development are also discussed here.
  • Acceptance Criteria – Details on all the conditions that are to be met before the system is handed over to the final customers are discussed in this section.

Structure of an SRS

1. Introduction –

The introduction explains the SRS meaning in general, its scope for your team, and its structure.

1.1. Purpose

Here, explain the SRS software documentation’s objective and structure: the types of requirements that will be addressed, as well as the personnel who will use it.

Keep this section short: 1-2 paragraphs are enough.

1.2. Intended Audience

You can go into great depth and explain how stakeholders and teams will work with SRS, as well as participate in its development. These are typically product owners, investors, business analysts, developers, sometimes testers, and operation staff. The entire structure is determined by your software development approach and the team’s organizational setup.

1.3. Intended Use

Describe in which situations your team will use the SRS. Usually, it’s used in the following cases:

  • designing and brainstorming new features
  • planning project duration, sprints, estimating costs
  • evaluating risks
  • monitoring and measuring the team’s success
  • conflicting situations when involved parties have different visions of a well-executed product.

1.4. Scope

This part covers the product’s scope, so you’ll need to give a quick overview of the system – its primary purpose, function, and position. It’s comparable to how you’d explain a product at a stakeholder meeting except that it is permitted to delve deeper into technical specifics.

This section has to describe:

  • All types of users are expected to engage with the system
  • All essential parts of the architecture

1.5 Definitions and Acronyms

Throughout your document, the team frequently uses certain words. Eliminating any potential misunderstandings, allowing new developers to onboard, and resolving conflicting situations will all be easier if you clear up the meaning of these words.

The above-mentioned components constitute a definition. Definitions provide information about the function, underlying technologies, target personas, business entities (users, clients, middlemen), and stakeholders. You may use an acronym to write your SRS more quickly if you choose to do so. The document will be readable as long as the table of definitions has it included.

2. Overall Description

In the second part, you describe the product’s major features, target users, and system scope to the readers. This description concentrates only on key features and software architecture without getting into specifics about add-ons and connections.

2.1 User Needs

This part is a matter of choice, so some organizations choose not to include it in their SRS engineering documentation. We believe it’s better to list the problems you want to solve with your functionality right now. It will come in handy later while brainstorming and monitoring functions. You can go back to this section at any time during the product development process and see whether the user experience team hasn’t strayed from the intended path.

Needs refer to issues that users will be able to solve with the system. You can divide these needs into subcategories if you deal with a highly segmented audience. Try not to go into details about each user’s needs. You need to leave some room for interpretation, just in case a problem turns out to be more significant than you initially thought.

2.2 Assumptions and Dependencies

Assumptions are the team’s assumptions about the product and its capabilities that will be correct in 99% of situations. It’s natural to assume, for example, that a platform that assists drivers navigating at night will be utilized mostly in nighttime mode.

What is the significance of assumptions? They allow you to concentrate on the app’s most important features first. This assumption aids in the understanding that designers must develop an interface suited for vision in the dark for a night-driving assistant. Some users may certainly open the application during the day, but it’s a long shot, so you don’t need to include related elements in the prototype right away.

3. System Features and Requirements

This part covers product features and execution criteria in detail. Because the previous two sections address the product as a whole, you’ll find a more comprehensive description here.

3.1 Functional Requirements

are stated in a list of functions that will be carried out in a system. These criteria are concerned with “what will be created?” rather than “how,” and “when.”

Functional requirements start by describing the functionality required based on how essential it is to the application. If you want to work on it first, you can begin with design, but you should then go into development. Functional requirements don’t go into great detail about technology stacks since they may change as the project progresses. Instead of concentrating on internal logic, functional requirements focus on end-user functionality.

3.2 External Interface requirements

Functional requirements are a significant portion of a system requirements specification. To cover all of the necessary features of the system, you’ll need 4-5 pages of information. Some teams break them down by themes to make the document easier to read.

Typically, SRS design components are referred to as separate from the backend and business logic. This makes sense since designers rather than developers handle the majority of this area, but also because it is where the product development process will begin.

Depending on the project, external interface requirements can consist of four types:

  • User interface
  • Software interface
  • Hardware interface
  • Communication interface

External interface requirements describe the page elements that will be visible to the end client. They can include the list of pages, design elements, key stylistic themes, even artistic elements, and more if they are essential to the product.

3.3 System Requirements

The product’s system requirements state the conditions under which it may be used. They usually pertain to hardware specifications and features. SRS hardware requirements are often defined by minimal and maximal ranges, as well as an optimal product performance threshold.

Creating system requirements before beginning to create a product may appear difficult, but it is essential. Developers must adhere to hardware requirements so that they do not have to restart the project later. Mobile apps (with many variables to consider) and applications that need high reactivity (games, any product with VR/AR, or IoT) are particularly vulnerable.

3.4 Non-Functional Requirements 

For many organizations, this portion of an SRS is the most difficult. If functional requirements address the question of what to create, non-functional standards define how. They establish the criteria according to how effectively the system must operate. Thresholds for performance, security, and usability are all included in this area.

The real value is what makes it hard to define non-functional requirements. Defining such phrases as “concurrency” or “portability” is difficult since they might have various interpretations for all parties involved. As a result, we advocate giving each non-functional requirement a score. You may revisit your project requirements at any time to see whether the current system satisfies initial expectations.

What Errors Should be Avoided When Crafting a System Requirements Specification?

As your skills in SRS development increase, the process will become expedited. Nonetheless, when you’re just beginning it’s wise to have a list of typical blunders handy for reference. To that end, mull over these:  

  • Neglecting to Incorporate a Comprehensive Glossary: Does your SRS contain jargon that only people within the industry are familiar with? If so, create a simple-to-understand dictionary section, and include definitions of any words or expressions not widely known. This will help ensure all users can understand both the document’s purpose and terminology.
  • Generating Disarray by Combining Ideas: Structure your document in an orderly fashion, and make sure to deliver information to readers in a logical progression. To prevent any misunderstanding or confusion, don’t muddle concepts together throughout the text.
  • Ignorance of the Target Audience’s Needs and Wants: In order to comprehend the anticipated output from software, it is important to discern who will be utilizing it as well as what results are expected. For instance, let’s say an app was created for report creation. Some of its requirements must entail how users can press certain buttons in order to obtain different documents. To truly understand what is required of this reporting program and also recognize who’ll be using it, you should have an insight into both the user and their expectations with regard to functionality.  
  • Being Ambiguous: Make certain that your needs are unambiguous. An SRS is formulated to avoid misunderstandings and hence, it is vital to make sure the document doesn’t create confusion. For each feature or condition description, ensure you don’t include functionalities that have not been specified yet.

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